Susan G. Komen for the Cure



Introduction


Susan G. Komen for the Cure (Komen) is an American non-profit organization that supports those who work to find a cure for breast cancer. Komen is well known for holding races and high profile events to raise money for breast cancer research. Komen’s logo is an easily recognizable pink ribbon that its supporters and partner organizations prominently display.

Komen’s critics contend that the organization uses too few of its resources on breast cancer research and that it commercializes the disease. Komen is also criticized for donating money to Planned Parenthood, the largest abortion provider in the world.


History / Mission


Nancy G. Brinker founded Susan G. Komen for the Cure in 1982. Brinker promised her sister who was dying of breast cancer – Susan G. Komen – that she would work to find a cure for breast cancer.

Komen describes itself as the “the boldest community fueling the best science and making the biggest impact in the fight against breast cancer.”[1] According to its website, through “events like the Komen Race for the Cure, we have invested almost $2 billion to fulfill our promise, working to end breast cancer in the U.S. and throughout the world through ground-breaking research, community health outreach, advocacy and programs in more than 50 countries.”[2]


Work


Through partnerships, races and events, Susan G. Komen for the Cure raises breast cancer awareness. Komen’s website has a great deal of information on understanding breast cancer including information about screening, diagnosis, treatment, risk factors and more.[3] Komen is perhaps best known for its Race for the Cure® events. Participants receive pledges for racing and Komen uses those funds to advance its work. On its website, Komen states that, “the Race for the Cure® Series is the world’s largest and most successful education and fundraising event for breast cancer ever created.”[4] In 2011, more than 1.6 million people participated in Race for the Cure® events.[5]

On its website, Komen also has an entire section dedicated to selling pink ribbon merchandise – including watches, earrings, purses and pocket squares.[6]


Small Spending on Research


Critics contend that Komen spends very little of its vast fortune actually helping fund research and actually combating breast cancer. In February 2012, Reuters analyzed Komen’s 2011 financial statements and reported that: “43 percent of donations were spent on education, 18 percent on fund-raising and administration, 15 percent on research awards and grants, 12 percent on screening and 5 percent on treatment.”[7] Upon learning that Komen dedicated only a small percentage of its donations to breast cancer research, one Komen supporter – a breast cancer survivor – told Reuters, it is “definitely a concern; 15 percent is shockingly small.”[8] Reuters also reported that in recent years, “[Komen] has cut by nearly half the proportion of fund-raising dollars it spends on grants to scientists working to understand the causes and develop effective new treatments for [breast cancer].”[9]

In contrast with Komen, the Breast Cancer Research Foundation spends 92 percent of its donations on research, according to Reuters.[10]


Cause Marketing


Komen generates significant funds (and criticism) through its use of cause marketing. Cause marketing is when a for-profit corporation teams up with a non-profit entity and donates a portion of the proceeds from a particular good or service to that charity.

Each year, Komen partners with numerous corporations to place pink ribbons and logos on apparel and merchandise with a portion of each purchase going to support Komen. Among Komen’s major corporate partners are Ford, New Balance, Bank of America, General Electric, American Airlines, Yoplait, Walgreens, Caterpillar and Belk.[11] Komen’s website states that, “[b]reast cancer research wouldn’t be possible without the corporate underwriting and support of corporations.”[12] In 2011, Komen generated $47 million through cause marketing campaigns.[13]

Other cancer research groups and commentators are critical of Komen’s emphasis on this type of cause marketing. Critics express concern that these campaigns primarily benefit corporate interests, and that some of Komen’s partner-corporations sell products that contain known carcinogens.

For years, Breast Cancer Action has been a leading critic of Komen’s marketing efforts. In 2002, Breast Cancer Action set up a website for consumers titled: “Think Before You Pink.”[14] The Think Before You Pink campaign “calls for more transparency and accountability by companies that take part in breast cancer fundraising, and encourages consumers to ask critical questions about pink ribbon promotions.”[15] According to Breast Cancer Action’s former executive director Barbara Brenner, the problem with Komen’s cause marketing is that “[w]ell-intentioned people think they’re helping women with breast cancer, but in fact they’re supporting a corporate bottom line.”[16]

In 2010, Komen teamed up with Kentucky Fried Chicken for a pink ribbon campaign that netted $4.2 million for the cancer organization.[17] Brenner accused Komen of “raising money for women’s health by selling a product that’s bad for your health… it’s hypocrisy.”[18] ABC News reported that, “[a]ccording to medical experts, there is an established connection between eating fatty, high caloric food and the risk for breast cancer.”[19]

The Think Before You Pink campaign blasted the Komen-KFC partnership, saying “[m]ake no mistake – every pink bucket purchase will do more to benefit KFC’s bottom line than it will to cure breast cancer. The Buckets for the Cure website, cast in a particularly sickening shade of pink, noted that ‘customer purchases of KFC buckets during the promotion will not directly increase the total contribution.’ In small print, of course.”[20] Think Before You Pink concluded that “[r]aising money in the name of breast cancer research, while engaged in a partnership with a corporation that may very well be contributing to this disease, is pinkwashing in its most egregious form.”[21]

In 2011, Komen teamed up with a perfume manufacturer to launch a pink-ribbon fragrance, called “Promise Me,” on the Home Shopping Network.[22] According to Karuna Jaggar, executive director of Breast Cancer Action, “the perfume’s ingredients… include chemicals linked to breast cancer in lab animals.”[23] Critical of Komen’s perfume partnership, cancer survivor Lani Horn told USA Today, “[t]here have been a lot of signals that Komen has lost touch with its core constituency. But this [perfume line] felt like a personal insult.”[24]

Komen executives have defended their cause marketing strategy by claiming that their corporate campaigns reach women who may not otherwise hear Komen’s message. In 2010, for example, then-Komen CEO Nancy Brinker defended the KFC partnership saying “[t]he partnership with KFC allowed us to reach many millions of women that we had not been able to reach before. If you look at the number of women who heard these messages for the very first time, it was a good partnership.”[25] In 2011, Brinker defended the perfume line saying that, “her appearance on the Home Shopping Network reached 91 million, including many who may not hear about breast cancer screening anywhere else.”[26]


Pink Ribbon Marketing


Due to its abundance of cause marketing campaigns, some cancer survivors have lashed out against Komen for overusing its pink ribbon. In early 2012, Canadian filmmaker Lea Pool released a documentary titled, “Pink Ribbons, Inc.” that examined and critiqued pink ribbon culture.[27] The film shows that some corporations deliberately exploit the “pink ribbon’”marketing strategy to boost sales of products and services and yet donate little or none of the actual profits to fund cancer research.[28] Critics describe Komen’s corporate partnership and image as “pinkwashing,” which reporter Gary Susman defines as: “using a kitschy, smiley-faced, rose-colored ribbon logo to mask the evidence that all the philanthropy has accomplished little other than giving PR cover to corporations that donate to the cause -- corporations that might otherwise be targets of complaints for the allegedly carcinogenic ingredients in their products.”[29]


Planned Parenthood Controversy


In early 2011, Komen became embroiled in a major media controversy over its funding of Planned Parenthood. After years of donating to Planned Parenthood, Komen decided to change that practice announcing, “we must continue to evolve to best meet the needs of the women we serve and most fully advance our mission.”[30]

The announcement was heralded by pro-life Americans. Penny Nance, president of the Concerned Women of America, said, “Planned Parenthood performs one in four abortions in this country. With this decision to cut their financial partnership, Susan G. Komen has chosen to benefit women’s health care.”[31] Additionally, Jennifer Biddison, an Internet consultant with the National Center for Public Policy Research, echoed many pro-life Americans when she wrote on the National Center’s blog: “[b]y ending its funding of Planned Parenthood, Komen has now become a viable funding choice for millions of pro-life Americans like myself. Rather than suddenly depriving poor women of low-cost screenings, it now has the opportunity to fund even more screenings as pro-lifers freely support the organization without reservation.”[32]

However, Planned Parenthood and the mainstream media launched a full-on assault on Komen, and the breast cancer charity quickly reversed its decision. In a Wall Street Journal article, Robert George and O. Carter Snead explained that, “[f]aced with even the tiniest depletion in the massive river of funds Planned Parenthood receives yearly, the behemoth mobilized its enormous cultural, media, financial and political apparatus to attack the Komen Foundation in the press, on TV and through social media.”[33] The authors point out that Planned Parenthood hardly needs Komen’s money – noting that the world’s largest abortion provider generated about $164 million in 2011 just terminating pregnancies – not including the millions more that Planned Parenthood rakes in on other services and government support.[34]

Within a week of making their announcement to stop its Planned Parenthood donations, Komen capitulated and issued a statement apologizing to the American public, and assuring Planned Parenthood that it would be able to apply for grants just as it had before.[35] Additionally, Karen Handel, Komen’s vice president for policy – and the driving force behind the initial decision to defund Planned Parenthood –resigned amid the controversy.[36] Handel blasted Planned Parenthood saying, “[t]he only place for politics in all of this came from Planned Parenthood -- when they launched this vicious, vicious attack on a great organization and perpetrated what was nothing short of a shakedown to coerce a private entity to give them grants.”[37]

By reversing course, critics suggest that Komen will forever be viewed through a political spectrum. According to James Freeman of the Wall Street Journal, “after reversing a decision to stop funding the country’s leading abortion provider, Komen is now going to have a hard time avoiding politics, period.”[38] Amy Ridenour, Chair of the National Center for Public Policy Research, explained how this will damage Komen’s reputation, saying: “Komen began the week with a reputation as a widely-respected health-oriented cancer-fighting organization with a relative handful of ‘more sorrow than in anger’ critics and ended it having gravely insulted tens of millions of people, leaving very many current and potential donors absolutely furious.”[39]


Public and Financial Backlash


In 2012, many Komen Race for the Cure events saw precipitous declines in participation and funds raised. According to the Seattle Times, the 2012 race in that city saw 40 percent fewer participants and raised $500,000 less than the 2011 race.[40] According to the San Jose Mercury News, registration for the San Francisco Komen race was down 50 percent and donations fell 65 percent.[41]

NPR reported that 2012 races in Washington, D.C, Tucson and Winston-Salem also saw a decline in participation.[42]

According to NewsBusters, the mainstream media often attributed Komen’s declining 2012 race participation and lackluster fundraising to disenfranchised pro-abortion advocates.[43] However, since Komen quickly reversed itself and continues to fund the world’s largest abortion provider, this hardly computes with reality.

Consider that, according to the Daily Caller, “[i]n the wake of this week’s announcement that Susan G. Komen for the Cure will no longer be awarding grants to Planned Parenthood, the breast cancer organization’s donations have gone up 100 percent in the last two days.”[44] This suggests that Komen’s 2012 struggles are coming from pro-life Americans who were previously unaware that Komen donated to the abortion machine that is Planned Parenthood. Now with full knowledge that Komen stands in solidarity with the world’s largest abortion machine, pro-life Americans decline to participate in races or support Komen.

Yet most mainstream media outlets continue to say that Komen’s struggles are pro-abortion boycotts. Jill Stenek of NewsBusters explains that, “[l]iberals must pursue this story line. The subliminal message is: Don’t mess with Planned Parenthood. It cannot be that pro-life withdrawal of support is the - or even a - problem. It is apparently inconceivable that pro-lifers previously unaware of Komen’s relationship with PP might be backing away.”[45]


Financials


In 2010, Komen had total revenues of $208,956,027.[46] According to its 990-tax form, in 2010, Komen also donated $63,879,763 to “other charitable organizations to support research and clinical investigation of breast cancer.”[47]


Leadership Shakeup


In August 2012, Nancy Brinker, Komen’s founder and CEO, resigned her position – amidst the turmoil following the Planned Parenthood scandal – saying, however, that she planned to remain at work with the charity in a lesser role.[48] Reportedly concerned about the role Brinker might still play in the organization, Komen President Liz Thompson announced she would leave the organization in September 2012.[49] At the same time, two board members, Brenda Lauderback and Lind Law, announced they were resigning from the Komen board.[50]


Leadership


Nancy G. Brinker, Founder and Chief Executive Officer (2010 Salary, $417,171) (In August 2012, Brinker announced she would step down as CEO, but stay on in a lesser capacity.)
Robert Taylor, Chair of the Board
Elizabeth Thompson, (Former) President (2010 Salary, $216,920)
Mark E. Nadolny, Chief Financial Officer (2010 Salary, $277,636)
Carol Corcoran, Senior Vice President, Affiliate Network
Margo K. Lucero, Vice President, Business Development and Partnerships
Katie Rohlman, Vice President, Human Resources
David Dawson, Vice President, Information Technology
Chandini Portteus, Vice President, Research, Evaluation and Scientific Programs


Contact Information


Susan G. Komen Headquarters
5005 LBJ Freeway, Suite 250
Dallas, TX 75244


Telephone: 1-877 GO KOMEN
Website: http://ww5.komen.org/Default.aspx

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  1. ^ “About Us,” Susan G. Komen for the Cure, available at http://ww5.komen.org/AboutUs/AboutUs.html as of October 31, 2012.
  2. ^ “About Us,” Susan G. Komen for the Cure, available at http://ww5.komen.org/AboutUs/AboutUs.html as of October 31, 2012.
  3. ^ “Understanding Breast Cancer,” Susan G. Komen for the Cure, available at http://ww5.komen.org/BreastCancer/UnderstandingBreastCancer.html as of October 31, 2012.
  4. ^ “About the Race,” Susan G. Komen for the Cure, available at http://apps.komen.org/raceforthecure/ as of October 31, 2012. (NOTE: Click the “About the Race” tab.)
  5. ^ “About the Race,” Susan G. Komen for the Cure, available at http://apps.komen.org/raceforthecure/ as of October 31, 2012. (NOTE: Click the “About the Race” tab.)
  6. ^ “ShopKomen.com,” Susan G. Komen for the Cure,” available at http://www.shopkomen.com/ as of October 31, 2012.
  7. ^ Sharon Bagley and Janet Roberts, “Insight: Komen Charity Under Microscope for Funding, Science,” Reuters, February 8, 2012, available at http://www.reuters.com/assets/print?aid=USTRE8171KW20120208 as of October 31, 2012.
  8. ^ Sharon Bagley and Janet Roberts, “Insight: Komen Charity Under Microscope for Funding, Science,” Reuters, February 8, 2012, available at http://www.reuters.com/assets/print?aid=USTRE8171KW20120208 as of October 31, 2012.
  9. ^ Sharon Bagley and Janet Roberts, “Insight: Komen Charity Under Microscope for Funding, Science,” Reuters, February 8, 2012, available at http://www.reuters.com/assets/print?aid=USTRE8171KW20120208 as of October 31, 2012.
  10. ^ Sharon Bagley and Janet Roberts, “Insight: Komen Charity Under Microscope for Funding, Science,” Reuters, February 8, 2012, available at http://www.reuters.com/assets/print?aid=USTRE8171KW20120208 as of October 31, 2012.
  11. ^ “Million Dollar Council Elite,” Susan G. Komen for the Cure, available at http://ww5.komen.org/MillionDollarCouncil.aspx?Elite=Elite as of October 31, 2012.
  12. ^ “Partners & Sponsors,” available at http://ww5.komen.org/Partners/PartnersSponsors.html as of October 31, 2012.
  13. ^ “Partners & Sponsors,” available at http://ww5.komen.org/Partners/PartnersSponsors.html as of October 31, 2012.
  14. ^ The “Think Before You Pink” homepage is available at http://thinkbeforeyoupink.org/ as of October 31, 2012.
  15. ^ “About Us,” Think Before You Pink, available at http://thinkbeforeyoupink.org/?page_id=12 as of October 31, 2012.
  16. ^ Daniel S. Levine, “Cancer Group Questions Value of Pink Ribbon Campaigns,” San Francisco Business Times, October 2, 2005, available at http://www.bizjournals.com/sanfrancisco/stories/2005/10/03/newscolumn5.html?s=print as of October 31, 2012.
  17. ^ “What Lego Can Learn from Victoria’s Secret,” Toronto Star, February 14, 2010, available at http://www.thestar.com/business/article/1130773--what-lego-can-learn-from-victoria-s-secret as of October 31, 2012.
  18. ^ Courtney Hutchison, “Fried Chicken for the Cure,” ABC News, April 24, 2010, available at http://abcnews.go.com/Health/Wellness/kfc-fights-breast-cancer-fried-chicken/story?id=10458830#.Tz0gS5irU-Y as of October 31, 2012.
  19. ^ Courtney Hutchison, “Fried Chicken for the Cure,” ABC News, April 24, 2010, available at http://abcnews.go.com/Health/Wellness/kfc-fights-breast-cancer-fried-chicken/story?id=10458830#.Tz0gS5irU-Y as of February 16, 2012.
  20. ^ “What the Cluck?!,” Think Before You Pink – Campaigns, available at http://thinkbeforeyoupink.org/?page_id=1011 as of October 31, 2012.
  21. ^ “What the Cluck?!,” Think Before You Pink – Campaigns, available at http://thinkbeforeyoupink.org/?page_id=1011 as of October 31, 2012.
  22. ^ Liz Szabo, “Komen’s Pink Ribbons Raise Green, and Questions,” USA Today, July 18, 2011, available at http://yourlife.usatoday.com/health/medical/cancer/story/2011/07/Komens-pink-ribbons-raise-green-and-questions/49472438/1 as of October 31, 2012.
  23. ^ Liz Szabo, “Komen’s Pink Ribbons Raise Green, and Questions,” USA Today, July 18, 2011, available at http://yourlife.usatoday.com/health/medical/cancer/story/2011/07/Komens-pink-ribbons-raise-green-and-questions/49472438/1 as of October 31, 2012.
  24. ^ Liz Szabo, “Komen’s Pink Ribbons Raise Green, and Questions,” USA Today, July 18, 2011, available at http://yourlife.usatoday.com/health/medical/cancer/story/2011/07/Komens-pink-ribbons-raise-green-and-questions/49472438/1 as of October 31, 2012.
  25. ^ Liz Szabo, “A ‘Promise’ Spurred Susan G. Komen, Breast Cancer Fight,” USA Today, September 29, 2010, available at http://www.usatoday.com/yourlife/health/medical/breastcancer/2010-09-30-Promisebook30_CV_N.htm as of October 31, 2012.
  26. ^ Liz Szabo, “Komen’s Pink Ribbons Raise Green, and Questions,” USA Today, July 18, 2011, available at http://yourlife.usatoday.com/health/medical/cancer/story/2011/07/Komens-pink-ribbons-raise-green-and-questions/49472438/1 as of February 16, 2012.
  27. ^ To view the trailer, see http://www.imdb.com/title/tt2035599/videogallery as of October 31, 2012.
  28. ^ Ira Pickett, “Is the Susan G. Komen Foundation Really Looking for a Cure, or Your Cash?,” CBS Tampa, February 4, 2012, available at http://tampa.cbslocal.com/2012/02/04/is-the-susan-g-komen-foundation-really-looking-for-a-cure-or-your-cash/ as of October 31, 2012.
  29. ^ Gary Susman, “‘Pink Ribbons, Inc.’: New Movie Explores the Controversy Behind Breast Cancer Charity,” Moviefone, February 3, 2012, available at http://news.moviefone.com/2012/02/03/pink-ribbons-breast-cancer-movie_n_1252824.html as of October 31, 2012.
  30. ^ Caroline May, “Susan G. Komen ends Grants to Planned Parenthood,” Daily Caller, February 1, 2012, available at http://dailycaller.com/2012/02/01/susan-g-komen-ends-grants-to-planned-parenthood/ as of October 31, 2012.
  31. ^ Caroline May, “Susan G. Komen ends Grants to Planned Parenthood,” Daily Caller, February 1, 2012, available at http://dailycaller.com/2012/02/01/susan-g-komen-ends-grants-to-planned-parenthood/ as of October 31, 2012.
  32. ^ Jennifer Biddison, “Komen-Planned Parenthood Split: Reward Komen’s Good Decision,” Amy Ridenour’s National Center Blog, February 1, 2012, available at http://www.conservativeblog.org/amyridenour/2012/2/1/komen-planned-parenthood-split-reward-komens-good-decision.html as of October 31, 2012.
  33. ^ Robert George and O. Carter Snead, “Planned Parenthood’s Hostages,” Wall Street Journal, February 6, 2012, available at http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052970204369404577206692451108960.html as of October 31, 2012.
  34. ^ Robert George and O. Carter Snead, “Planned Parenthood’s Hostages,” Wall Street Journal, February 6, 2012, available at http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052970204369404577206692451108960.html as of October 31, 2012.
  35. ^ “Statement from Susan G. Komen Board of Directors and Founder and CEO Nancy G. Brinker,” Susan G. Komen for the Cure – Press Release, February 3, 2012, available at http://ww5.komen.org/KomenNewsArticle.aspx?id=19327354148 as of October 31, 2012.
  36. ^ “Komen Foundation VP Resigns, Blasts Planned Parenthood,” CNN, February 7, 2012, available at http://www.cnn.com/2012/02/07/us/komen-executive-resigns/index.html as of October 31, 2012.
  37. ^ “Komen Foundation VP Resigns, Blasts Planned Parenthood,” CNN, February 7, 2012, available at http://www.cnn.com/2012/02/07/us/komen-executive-resigns/index.html as of October 31, 2012.
  38. ^ James Freeman, “Komen’s Next Headache,” Wall Street Journal, February 9, 2012, available at http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052970203824904577213162703799378.html as of October 31, 2012.
  39. ^ Amy Ridenour, “Susan G. Komen to Baby Girls: Drop Dead (We Only Care When You’re Old),” Amy Ridenour’s National Center Blog, February 3, 2012, available at http://www.conservativeblog.org/amyridenour/2012/2/3/susan-g-komen-to-baby-girls-drop-dead-we-only-care-when-your.html as of October 31, 2012.
  40. ^ Sandi Doughton, “Komen Participation Down 40 Percent; Donations Down $500,000,” The Seattle Times, June 3, 2012, available at http://blogs.seattletimes.com/today/2012/06/komen-participation-down-40-percent-donations-down-500000/ as of October 31, 2012.
  41. ^ Julia Prodis Sulek, “Komen Controversy Drags Down San Francisco Breast Cancer Walk Participation,” San Jose Mercury News, September 2, 2012, available at http://www.mercurynews.com/health/ci_21456373/komen-controversy-drags-down-san-francisco-breast-cancer as of November 1, 2012.
  42. ^ Scott Hensley, “Planned Parenthood Controversy Hangs Over Komen’s Fundraising Races,” NPR, June 1, 2012, available at http://www.npr.org/blogs/health/2012/06/01/154135526/planned-parenthood-controversy-hangs-over-komens-fundraising-races as of October 31, 2012.
  43. ^ Jill Stanek, “MSM Claims Komen Donations Down Due to Pro-Abortion – Not Pro-Life – Boycott,” NewsBusters, March 29, 2012, available at http://newsbusters.org/print/54789 as of November 1, 2012.
  44. ^ Caroline May, “After Cutting Ties With Planned Parenthood, Komen Donations Up 100 Percent,” Daily Caller, February 2, 2012, available at http://dailycaller.com/2012/02/02/after-cutting-ties-with-planned-parenthood-komen-donations-up-100-percent/ as of November 1, 2012.
  45. ^ Jill Stanek, “MSM Claims Komen Donations Down Due to Pro-Abortion – Not Pro-Life – Boycott,” NewsBusters, March 29, 2012, available at http://newsbusters.org/print/54789 as of November 1, 2012.
  46. ^ Komen’s 2010 990 form is available at http://ww5.komen.org/uploadedFiles/Content/AboutUs/Financial/KOMEN%20PARENT%20PDC%20wout%20PW.pdf as of October 31, 2012.
  47. ^ Komen’s 2010 990 form is available at http://ww5.komen.org/uploadedFiles/Content/AboutUs/Financial/KOMEN%20PARENT%20PDC%20wout%20PW.pdf as of October 31, 2012.
  48. ^ Sarah Kliff and Lena H. Sun, “The Komen Foundation’s Very Big Leadership Shake-Up,” Washington Post, August 8, 2012, available at http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/ezra-klein/wp/2012/08/08/the-komen-foundations-very-big-leadership-shake-up/ as of October 31, 2012.
  49. ^ Sarah Kliff and Lena H. Sun, “The Komen Foundation’s Very Big Leadership Shake-Up,” Washington Post, August 8, 2012, available at http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/ezra-klein/wp/2012/08/08/the-komen-foundations-very-big-leadership-shake-up/ as of October 31, 2012.
  50. ^ Sarah Kliff and Lena H. Sun, “The Komen Foundation’s Very Big Leadership Shake-Up,” Washington Post, August 8, 2012, available at http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/ezra-klein/wp/2012/08/08/the-komen-foundations-very-big-leadership-shake-up/ as of October 31, 2012.