NAACP



Introduction


The National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) is a civil rights group that promotes a racial and progressive agenda.

The NAACP message contradicts what civil rights leader Martin Luther King Jr. stood for. Dr. King advanced the American notion that men should be judged by the content of their character. By contrast, the NAACP promotes a race-first agenda that seeks to elevate minorities in school, politics, and the workplace based only on skin-color. The NAACP advocates for affirmative action programs that regularly discriminate against white and Asian Americans.


History and Mission


The NAACP was formed partly in response to the horrific practice of lynching and the 1908 race riot in Springfield, Illinois. Appalled at the violence against blacks, a Mary White Ovington and Oswald Garrison Villard (both the descendants of abolitionists), William English Walling, and Dr. Henry Moscowitz issued a call for a meeting to discuss racial justice.

The NAACP is America’s oldest and largest civil rights group.[1] With approximately 500,000 members worldwide, its mission is “to ensure the political, educational, social, and economic equality of rights of all persons and to eliminate racial hatred and racial discrimination.”[2]

In order to combat what it views as racial inequity, the NAACP actively lobbies for the “enactment and enforcement of federal, state, and local laws securing civil rights.”[3] The NAACP is composed of several departments. The NAACP Legal Department focuses on court cases of broad application to minorities, such as perceived discrimination in employment, government and education. The NAACP also works to improve public education at the local, state and federal levels. Each state has its own NAACP chapter.


Ties to Communism

At times in its history, the NAACP has been closely associated with radical political networks. In 1922, the NAACP began receiving grants from the Garland Fund. The Garland Fund was run and influenced by communist supporters such as William Z. Foster, Benjamin Gitlow, Elizabeth Gurley Flynn, Scott Nearing and American Civil Liberties Union founder Roger Baldwin.[4] In 1938, NAACP members participated in the Soviet-controlled World Youth Congress. During the 1940s, the NAACP was affiliated with the Communist-involved World Federation of Democratic Youth.[5] In 1946, the NAACP supported the establishment of the Communist-dominated Progressive Party.[6]


NAACP In the Courts

In 1954, the NAACP successfully argued for color-blind justice in the seminal Supreme Court case, Brown v. Board of Education. More recently, however, the nature of the NAACP’s crusades has changed. While claiming that its “primary focus … continues to be the protection and enhancement of the civil rights of African Americans and other minorities,” the organization now supports racial preferences rather than equal rights.[7]

The shift was articulated by Thurgood Marshall, who, as NAACP Chief Counsel in 1954, argued in his brief for the Brown case that “[d]istinctions by race are so evil, so arbitrary and invidious that a state, bound to defend the equal protection of the laws must not invoke them in any public sphere.”[8] But as a Supreme Court Justice in the 1960s, Marshall told fellow Justice William O. Douglas in a conversation about racial preferences: “You [white] guys have been practicing discrimination for years. Now it’s our turn.”[9]

Today, the NAACP supports racial gerrymandering, “a system whereby Congressional voting districts are drawn along racial rather than geographic lines, so as to ensure the election of black representatives in those districts.”[10] Furthermore, it favors redistributive economic policies both at home and abroad. According to the NAACP, it is “dedicated to closing the gap of disparities faced by people of color across the globe by promoting fair and equitable human rights and economic justice.”[11]

In October 2004, after several complaints were filed, the Internal Revenue Service investigated the NAACP’s tax-exempt status. The IRS said the NAACP may have violated the restrictions on political activity when it “distributed statements in opposition of George W. Bush for the office of the presidency.”[12] By law, a tax-exempt organization cannot show support or disapproval of any political campaign. Despite this apparent violation, following a short-lived investigation, the IRS dismissed the charges.[13]

Voting Rights

The NAACP opposes voter ID laws, claiming they are really efforts to disfranchise minority voters.

The NAACP often uses incendiary rhetoric to oppose voter integrity measures. NAACP President Benjamin Jealous has, for example, compared voter ID laws to now defunct Jim Crow laws that promoted legal racial discrimination.[14] Jealous has also charged that voter ID laws enacted since 2010 are a racial backlash against the 2008 election of President Barack Obama and that these laws stemmed from “the worst and most racial elements” of the Tea Party.[15]

In an effort to quell voter ID laws, and to present its opinion on democratically enacted state-level voter integrity measures, the NAACP set up the “2012 This is My Vote” web site.[16] On this web site, the NAACP claims that “[v]oting rights are under attack. Our nation is in the midst of the most aggressive attempt to roll back voting rights in over a century.”[17]

In its list of talking points, the NAACP makes multiple dramatic and unsubstantiated claims. According to the NAACP web site:
  • “In 2011, America saw an unprecedented and coordinated attack on access to the ballot box, an attack likely to dampen voter participation among African-Americans, other minorities, younger voters and the elderly.”[18]
  • “The greatest coordinated legislative attack on voting rights since the dawn of Jim Crow more than a hundred years ago was in response to record turnout among minority voters in the 2008 elections.”[19]
  • “New voter identification laws are nothing but reincarnated poll taxes and literacy tests, designed to disproportionately suppress the voting numbers of people of color.”[20]
Additionally, the NAACP published the booklet “Defending Democracy” in late 2011.[21] While the report was said to cover the “findings of our research” on “restrictive measures across the country designed to thwart electoral strength among people of color,” nowhere within the reports 68 pages and 238 footnotes is there a single concrete example of a person being denied the ability to vote.[22]

State legislators, however, say the sole purpose of voter ID laws are to combat vote fraud and have nothing to do with race or voter suppression. For example, in July 2012, Texas attorneys defended their state’s new voter ID laws against U.S. Department of Justice complaints saying, “photo identification at the polls is needed to combat a culture of election fraud plaguing the state.”[23] Likewise, in a court filing, South Carolina’s attorney general explained that its state’s elected officials passed a 2011 voter ID measure “for the purposes of preventing instances of voter fraud at the poll and enhancing public confidence in the integrity of the electoral process.”[24]

United Nations Delegation

In March 2012, a NAACP delegation met with officials from the United Nations Human Rights Council in Geneva, Switzerland to complain “that a co-ordinated legislative attempt is being made by states across America to disfranchise millions of black and Latino voters in November's presidential election.”[25] The stated purpose of the NAACP delegation’s visit was to “call on the UN body to launch a formal investigation into the spread of restrictive electoral laws, particularly in southern states.”[26] Hilary Shelton, NAACP Washington, D.C. bureau director, explained “we do want the council to come in and observe, to see what’s going on in the United States and have that outside look in, that fresh perspective on this disenfranchising processes, to do a report that will be shared with the United States so we could utilize it in a very informed way.”[27]

However, in June 2012, a delegation from Project 21 (a project of the National Center for Public Policy Research) met with UN assistant secretary for human right Ivan Simonovic and another UN official at UN headquarters in New York City. They were informed that the UN has no intentions of investigating American elections per the NAACP’s demands.[28] According to Project 21 member Horace Cooper, “[t]he NAACP's misleading claim that the U.N. was somehow concerned about voter ID laws in America was proved to be bogus. Not only is the Human Rights Council not treating the matter seriously, but they weren’t even really aware of the NAACP’s meeting.”[29]

Attacks Against the Tea Party

In July 2010, the NAACP approved a resolution condemning what it called “racist elements” within the Tea Party.[30] Charges of racism against the Tea Party circulated after African-American congressmen said they were heckled, spat at, and assailed with racial slurs by Tea Party supporters during a demonstration at the U.S. Capitol. As of September 2010, there is no video evidence to validate these claims.

In fact, journalist Andrew Breitbart has offered a $100,000 reward for video evidence of a Tea Party member using racial epithets at this rally.[31] Despite hundreds of cameras and recording devices around, as of September 2010, the reward remains unclaimed. The NAACP demanded that Tea Party officials “expel the bigots and racists or take responsibility for their actions.”[32] Tea Party officials reminded the NAACP that they failed to encourage "civilize discourse when Republicans were in the White House.”[33] They also accused the NAACP of being “professional race-baiters.”[34] The NAACP made an illogical leap from accusing a few Tea Party members of racist remarks to accusing the entire movement of being racist.

Project 21, a national network of black conservatives and an initiative of the National Center for Public Policy Research, compiled statements from African-Americans who condemned the NAACP’s attacks against the Tea Party. On July 17, 2010, Deneen Borelli, a Project 21 Fellow, debated NAACP Senior Vice President, Hilary Shelton, on Fox News’ “America’s Newsroom.”[35] During the debate, Shelton claimed that he had attended a Tea Party event and witnessed racism.[36] The National Center for Public Policy Research discovered that a few days before, Shelton had in fact stated on national television that he had never been to a Tea Party event.[37] Borelli charged the NAACP with playing the “race card,” calling the NAACP’s resolution a “last-ditch effort to push their (NAACP) agenda for plantation politics.”[38]


Funding

The NAACP has received funding from the AT&T Foundation,[39] the Bauman Family Foundation,[40] the Carnegie Corporation of New York,[41] the Annie E. Casey Foundation,[42] the Freddie Mac Foundation,[43] the Ford Foundation,[44] the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation,[45] the JEHT Foundation,[46] the Joyce Foundation,[47] the W.K. Kellogg Foundation,[48] the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation,[49] the Open Society Institute,[50] the David and Lucile Packard Foundation,[51] the Rockefeller Foundation,[52] the Sara Lee Foundation,[53] the Scherman Foundation,[54] the Verizon Foundation,[55] the Tides Foundation[56] and Boeing.[57]

In the 2010-11 fiscal year, the National Education Association (the largest labor union in the United States) donated $25,000 to the NAACP.[58]

Leadership (as of August 2010)

President/CEO: Benjamin Jealous (2007 salary: $93,020)
Chief of Staff: Roger Vann
Senior Vice President: Dennis Hayes (2007 salary: $226,857)
Director to the NAACP’s Washington Bureau: Hillary Shelton (2007 salary: $113,670)


Contact Information

4805 Mt. Hope Drive
Baltimore, MD 21215
http://www.naacp.org


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  1. ^
    NAACP, “Our Mission,” NAACP.org, downloaded from http://www.naacp.org/about/mission/index.htm on June 14, 2010.
  2. ^ NAACP, “Our Mission,” NAACP.org, downloaded from http://www.naacp.org/about/mission/index.htm on June 14, 2010.
  3. ^
    NAACP, “Our Mission,” NAACP.org, downloaded from http://www.naacp.org/about/mission/index.htm on June 14, 2010.
  4. ^
    Bernard Eisenberg, “Only for the Bourgeois? James Weldon Johnson and the NAACP, 1916-1930,” Phylon Vol. 43 No. 2, pp. 110-124, downloaded from http://www.jstor.org/pss/274461 on June 14, 2010.
  5. ^ Lowell Ponte, “Unholy Trinity,” Front Page Magazine, July 16, 2004, downloaded from http://97.74.65.51/readArticle.aspx?ARTID=12181 on June 14, 2010.
  6. ^ Al Benson, Jr., “The NAACP’s Red Roots,” Front Page Magazine, July 7, 2000, downloaded from http://97.74.65.51/readArticle.aspx?ARTID=22255 on July 21, 2010.
  7. ^
    NAACP, “Our Mission,” NAACP.org, downloaded from http://www.naacp.org/about/mission/index.htm on June 14, 2010.
  8. ^
    George F. Will, “Evil Distinctions,” New York Post, July 5, 2007, downloaded from http://www.nypost.com/f/print/news/opinion/opedcolumnists/item_2XLJSgyOIEkl6wQhLiCgwN on June 14, 2010.
  9. ^ Evan Thomas, “Law: When the Dogs Stopped Snapping,” Time Magazine, September 29, 1980, downloaded from http://www.time.com/time/magazine/article/0,9171,952817,00.html on June 14, 2010.
  10. ^
    Center for Individual Rights, “Supreme Court Ends Racial Gerrymandering,” cir-usa.org, downloaded from http://www.cir-usa.org/cases/reno.html on June 14, 2010.
  11. ^ NAACP, “International Affairs,” NAACP.org, downloaded from http://www.naacp.org/advocacy/international/ on June 14, 2010.
  12. ^
    Mike Allen, “NAACP Faces IRS Investigation,” Washington Post, October 29, 2004, downloaded from http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A7433-2004Oct28.html on June 14, 2010.
  13. ^ Mike Allen, “NAACP Faces IRS Investigation,” Washington Post, October 29, 2004, downloaded from http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A7433-2004Oct28.html on June 14, 2010.
  14. ^
    Jason Kandel, “NAACP Head Likens Voter ID Measures to Jim Crow,” Reuters, July 25, 2011, available at http://www.reuters.com/article/2011/07/25/us-naacp-voters-idUSTRE76O6NP20110725 as of July 9, 2012.
  15. ^ Jason Kandel, “NAACP Head Likens Voter ID Measures to Jim Crow,” Reuters, July 25, 2011, available at http://www.reuters.com/article/2011/07/25/us-naacp-voters-idUSTRE76O6NP20110725 as of July 9, 2012.
  16. ^
    “2012 This is My Vote,” National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, available at http://www.thisismyvote.org/ as of
  17. ^ “2012 This is My Vote – the Issue,” National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, available at http://www.thisismyvote.org/pages/the-issue1 as of July 9, 2012.
  18. ^ “2012 This is My Vote – Resources (Talking Points),” National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, available at http://www.thisismyvote.org/pages/educational-resources as of July 10, 2012.
  19. ^ “2012 This is My Vote – Resources (Talking Points),” National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, available at http://www.thisismyvote.org/pages/educational-resources as of July 10, 2012.
  20. ^ “2012 This is My Vote – Resources (Talking Points),” National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, available at http://www.thisismyvote.org/pages/educational-resources as of July 10, 2012.
  21. ^
    “Defending Democracy: Confronting Modern Barriers to Voting Rights in America,” National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, December 5, 2011, available at http://naacp.3cdn.net/67065c25be9ae43367_mlbrsy48b.pdf as of July 10, 2012.
  22. ^ “Defending Democracy: Confronting Modern Barriers to Voting Rights in America,” National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, December 5, 2011, available at http://naacp.3cdn.net/67065c25be9ae43367_mlbrsy48b.pdf as of July 10, 2012.
  23. ^


    Drew Singer, “Texas Says Voter ID Law Needed to Combat Election Fraud,” Reuters, July 9, 2012, available at http://www.reuters.com/article/2012/07/09/us-usa-texas-voter-idUSBRE8681H720120709 as of July 10, 2012.
  24. ^ “Complaint for Declaratory Judgment,” State of South Carolina v. United States of America, United States District Court for the District of Columbia, February 7, 2012, available at http://www.scag.gov/wp-content/uploads/2012/02/2012-02-07-Complaint-Voter-ID.pdf as of July 10, 2012.
  25. ^
    Ed Pilkington, “NAACP to Call on UN to Investigate Voter Disenfranchisement in US,” The Guardian, March 9, 2012, available at http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2012/mar/09/naacp-un-voter-disfranchisement-us as of July 9, 2012.
  26. ^ Ed Pilkington, “NAACP to Call on UN to Investigate Voter Disenfranchisement in US,” The Guardian, March 9, 2012, available at http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2012/mar/09/naacp-un-voter-disfranchisement-us as of July 9, 2012.
  27. ^ “NAACP Takes Case Against Voter ID Laws to UN,” NPR, March 15, 2012, available at http://www.npr.org/2012/03/15/148678008/naacp-takes-case-against-voter-id-laws-to-un as of July 9, 2012.
  28. ^
    “Forget It, NAACP: United Nations Has No Plans to Investigate U.S. Voter ID Laws,” National Center for Public Policy – Press Release, June 14, 2012, available at http://www.nationalcenter.org/P21PR-UN_NAACP_061412.html as of July 9, 2012.
  29. ^ “Forget It, NAACP: United Nations Has No Plans to Investigate U.S. Voter ID Laws,” National Center for Public Policy – Press Release, June 14, 2012, available at http://www.nationalcenter.org/P21PR-UN_NAACP_061412.html as of July 9, 2012.
  30. ^
    NAACP, “NAACP Delegates Unanimously Pass Tea Party Amendment,” naacp.org, July 13, 2010, downloaded from http://www.naacp.org/press/entry/naacp-delegates-unanimously-pass-tea-party-amendment/ on August 3, 2010.
  31. ^
    Jack Cashill, “NAACP, media owe Tea Party apology,” wnd.com, July 15, 2010, downloaded from http://www.wnd.com/index.php?pageId=178965 on August 3, 2010.
  32. ^ Cheryl Corley, “NAACP, Tea Party Volley Over Racism Claims,” npr.org, July 14, 2010, downloaded from http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=128505089 on August 3, 2010.
  33. ^ Cheryl Corley, “NAACP, Tea Party Volley Over Racism Claims,” npr.org, July 14, 2010, downloaded from http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=128505089 on August 3, 2010.
  34. ^ Cheryl Corley, “NAACP, Tea Party Volley Over Racism Claims,” npr.org, July 14, 2010, downloaded from http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=128505089 on August 3, 2010.
  35. ^
    National Center for Public Policy Research, “Deneen Borelli Debates NAACP’s Hilary Shelton on Fox,” conservativeblog.org, downloaded from http://www.conservativeblog.org/amyridenour/2010/7/16/deneen-borelli-debates-naacps-hilary-shelton-on-fox.html on August 4, 2010.
  36. ^ National Center for Public Policy Research, “Deneen Borelli Debates NAACP’s Hilary Shelton on Fox,” conservativeblog.org, downloaded from http://www.conservativeblog.org/amyridenour/2010/7/16/deneen-borelli-debates-naacps-hilary-shelton-on-fox.html on August 4, 2010.
  37. ^ National Center for Public Policy Research, “Deneen Borelli Debates NAACP’s Hilary Shelton on Fox,” conservativeblog.org, downloaded from http://www.conservativeblog.org/amyridenour/2010/7/16/deneen-borelli-debates-naacps-hilary-shelton-on-fox.html on August 4, 2010.
  38. ^ National Center for Public Policy Research, “Deneen Borelli Debates NAACP’s Hilary Shelton on Fox,” conservativeblog.org, downloaded from http://www.conservativeblog.org/amyridenour/2010/7/16/deneen-borelli-debates-naacps-hilary-shelton-on-fox.html on August 4, 2010.
  39. ^
    Guidestar, “NAACP Grant Explorer,” guidestar.org, downloaded from http://www.guidestar.org/pqShowGsReport.do?partner=iwave&grantType=funder&npoId=333595&gotoNext=/reports/partners/iwave/showFunders.jsp&grantSortBy=orgYear&grantPageNum=2#grants on June 23, 2010.
  40. ^ Guidestar, “NAACP Grant Explorer,” guidestar.org, downloaded from http://www.guidestar.org/pqShowGsReport.do?partner=iwave&grantType=funder&npoId=333595&gotoNext=/reports/partners/iwave/showFunders.jsp&grantSortBy=orgYear&grantPageNum=2#grants on June 23, 2010.
  41. ^ Guidestar, “NAACP Legal Defense Fund,” guidestar.org, downloaded from http://www.guidestar.org/pqShowGsReport.do?partner=iwave&grantType=funder&npoId=109009&gotoNext=/reports/partners/iwave/showFunders.jsp&grantSortBy=year&grantPageNum=5 on June 23, 2010.
  42. ^ Guidestar, “NAACP Legal Defense Fund,” guidestar.org, downloaded from http://www.guidestar.org/pqShowGsReport.do?partner=iwave&grantType=funder&npoId=109009&gotoNext=/reports/partners/iwave/showFunders.jsp&grantSortBy=year&grantPageNum=5 on June 23, 2010.
  43. ^ Guidestar, “NAACP Grant Explorer,” guidestar.org, downloaded from http://www.guidestar.org/pqShowGsReport.do?partner=iwave&grantType=funder&npoId=333595&gotoNext=/reports/partners/iwave/showFunders.jsp&grantSortBy=orgYear&grantPageNum=2#grants on June 23, 2010.
  44. ^ Guidestar, “NAACP Legal Defense Fund,” guidestar.org, downloaded from http://www.guidestar.org/pqShowGsReport.do?partner=iwave&grantType=funder&npoId=109009&gotoNext=/reports/partners/iwave/showFunders.jsp&grantSortBy=year&grantPageNum=5 on June 23, 2010.
  45. ^ Guidestar, “NAACP Grant Explorer,” guidestar.org, downloaded from http://www.guidestar.org/pqShowGsReport.do?partner=iwave&grantType=funder&npoId=333595&gotoNext=/reports/partners/iwave/showFunders.jsp&grantSortBy=orgYear&grantPageNum=2#grants on June 23, 2010.
  46. ^ Guidestar, “NAACP Grant Explorer,” guidestar.org, downloaded from http://www.guidestar.org/pqShowGsReport.do?partner=iwave&grantType=funder&npoId=333595&gotoNext=/reports/partners/iwave/showFunders.jsp&grantSortBy=orgYear&grantPageNum=2#grants on June 23, 2010.
  47. ^ Guidestar, “NAACP Grant Explorer,” guidestar.org, downloaded from http://www.guidestar.org/pqShowGsReport.do?partner=iwave&grantType=funder&npoId=333595&gotoNext=/reports/partners/iwave/showFunders.jsp&grantSortBy=orgYear&grantPageNum=2#grants on June 23, 2010.
  48. ^ Guidestar, “NAACP Grant Explorer,” guidestar.org, downloaded from http://www.guidestar.org/pqShowGsReport.do?partner=iwave&grantType=funder&npoId=333595&gotoNext=/reports/partners/iwave/showFunders.jsp&grantSortBy=orgYear&grantPageNum=2#grants on June 23, 2010.
  49. ^ Guidestar, “NAACP Grant Explorer,” guidestar.org, downloaded from http://www.guidestar.org/pqShowGsReport.do?partner=iwave&grantType=funder&npoId=333595&gotoNext=/reports/partners/iwave/showFunders.jsp&grantSortBy=orgYear&grantPageNum=2#grants on June 23, 2010.
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  51. ^ Guidestar, “NAACP Grant Explorer,” guidestar.org, downloaded from http://www.guidestar.org/pqShowGsReport.do?partner=iwave&grantType=funder&npoId=333595&gotoNext=/reports/partners/iwave/showFunders.jsp&grantSortBy=orgYear&grantPageNum=2#grants on June 23, 2010.
  52. ^ Guidestar, “NAACP Grant Explorer,” guidestar.org, downloaded from http://www.guidestar.org/pqShowGsReport.do?partner=iwave&grantType=funder&npoId=333595&gotoNext=/reports/partners/iwave/showFunders.jsp&grantSortBy=orgYear&grantPageNum=2#grants on June 23, 2010.
  53. ^ Guidestar, “NAACP Grant Explorer,” guidestar.org, downloaded from http://www.guidestar.org/pqShowGsReport.do?partner=iwave&grantType=funder&npoId=333595&gotoNext=/reports/partners/iwave/showFunders.jsp&grantSortBy=orgYear&grantPageNum=2#grants on June 23, 2010.
  54. ^ Guidestar, “NAACP Grant Explorer,” guidestar.org, downloaded from http://www.guidestar.org/pqShowGsReport.do?partner=iwave&grantType=funder&npoId=333595&gotoNext=/reports/partners/iwave/showFunders.jsp&grantSortBy=orgYear&grantPageNum=2#grants on June 23, 2010.
  55. ^ Guidestar, “NAACP Grant Explorer,” guidestar.org, downloaded from http://www.guidestar.org/pqShowGsReport.do?partner=iwave&grantType=funder&npoId=333595&gotoNext=/reports/partners/iwave/showFunders.jsp&grantSortBy=orgYear&grantPageNum=2#grants on June 23, 2010.
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  58. ^
    Mike Antonucci, “NEA Gave More than $18.8 Million to Advocacy Groups,” Hot Air, January 9, 2011, available at http://hotair.com/greenroom/archives/2012/01/09/nea-gave-more-than-18-8-million-to-advocacy-groups/ as of January 11, 2012.