Ford Foundation


Introduction


The Ford Foundation is a private organization that funds liberal programs that support:
  • the weakening of homeland security and anti-terrorism measures
  • the suspension of American borders
  • the promotion of mass, open immigration to the United States
  • the redistribution of wealth
  • the depiction of Israel as an oppressor state that routinely victimizes its Palestinian minority
  • the reduction of an American military presence
  • the implementation of affirmative action policies
  • the characterization of America as an unapologetic polluter whose industrial pursuits directly harm the natural environment
  • the portrayal of the U.S. as a violator of human rights both at home and abroad
  • the depiction of America as an aggressively militaristic nation and
  • the support for taxpayer-funded abortion-on-demand as an inalienable right for all women.

The Ford Foundation advances these goals by making grants or loans to various organizations, individuals and projects.[1]


History and Mission


Founded by Edsel Ford of Ford Motor Company in 1936, the Ford Foundation was initially chartered to “receive and administer funds for scientific, educational, and charitable purposes, all for the public welfare.”[2]

When Henry Ford II resigned from the Foundation’s Board of Trustees in 1977, he expressed his profound disgust with how the institution and most of its trustees had drifted radically to the political left. Lamenting the Foundation’s rejection of the economic system that had made its very existence possible, Mr. Ford wrote in his resignation letter:[3]
In effect, the Foundation is a creature of capitalism, a statement that, I’m sure, would be shocking to many professional staff people in the field of philanthropy. It is hard to discern recognition of this fact in anything the Foundation does. It is even more difficult to find an understanding of this in many of the institutions, particularly the universities that are the beneficiaries of the Foundation’s grant programs.


The Ford Foundation’s self-described objective is to “strengthen democratic values, reduce poverty and injustice, promote international cooperation, and advance human achievement.”[4]


Controversy

Funding Terrorist Groups:

In 2001, the United Nations held a conference in South Africa to ostensibly combat racism. Unfortunately, the conference turned into “a world-stage for anti-Americanism and the crudest kind of anti-Semitic imagery.”[5] Then-Secretary of State Colin Powell ordered the American delegation to return home. Edwin Black, a writer for the Jewish Telegraphic Agency, reported that much of the funding for anti-Semitic propaganda came from the Ford Foundation.[6]

In 2000 and 2001, the Ford Foundation distributed $35 million to 272 Arab and pro-Palestinian organizations.[7] Some of those millions were sent to organizations at the South African conference.[8] For example, PNGO, an umbrella group of 90 Palestinian NGOs, has received more than $1 million from Ford.[9] Its director has admitted that PNGO gets almost no Arab support and that Ford is its biggest funder.[10] PNGO denounced as “unacceptable” a U.S. government requirement that Palestinian NGOs partnering with tax-exempt American charities sign a pledge promising that no funds would ever find their way to “advocate or support terrorist activities.”[11] Ford Foundation President Susan Berresford acknowledged in a November 17, 2003 letter to Congressman Jerrold Nadler (D-NY) that she and her colleagues at the Ford Foundation “now recognize that we did not have a clear picture of the activities, organizations and people involved.”[12]


Sterilization:

The Ford Foundation at one point subscribed to the theory that the world was headed toward overpopulation.[13] In the 1970s, the Ford Foundation endorsed research that helped bring about a World Bank-funded sterilization program in India.[14] The program killed 1,774 people through failed medical services.[15]


Global Warming:

In 2010, the Ford Foundation withdrew $85 million from its bank account in order to advance the climate change agenda.[16] The $85 million initiative is part of a 5-year plan to make rural and indigenous folks more active in the climate change arena.[17] Because, according to Ford officials, 30 percent of all greenhouse emissions come from rural communities, Ford hopes its initiative will convince these communities to jump on the global warming bandwagon.[18]


Affirmative Action:

In 2005, 230 graduate students attended a Conference of Ford Fellows.[19] Over two days, Ford brought in some of the nation’s most liberal academics (including Columbia law professor Kimberle W. Crenshaw) to encourage students to defend affirmative actions programs for minorities.[20] Initially, Ford called its fellowship program “Fellowship for Minorities,” only extending financial support to six minority groups.[21] The Ford Foundation also paid for the University of Michigan’s defense of affirmative action in the 2003 United States Supreme Court case Grutter v. Bollinger.[22] The Court ruled that a student’s race may be considered in an admissions process, but universities may not hold quotas.


Education Reform:

In 2009, the Ford Foundation wrote out a $100 million grant to “transform secondary education in the nation’s most disadvantaged schools.”[23] Instead of allocating money to charter schools, Teach for America or voucher programs, the $100 million grant went to teachers unions.[24] Ironically, according to the Wall Street Journal, some of “the worst school districts in the nation spend the most money on students.”[25]


Failed Organizations:

Over the years Ford has funded some flawed programs including Head Start.[26] Head Start, a program of the United States Department of Health and Human Services, began in 1965. Head Start was designed to prepare children from low-income families for school, thereby closing the socio-economic gap among America’s youth. The program received $6.8 billion in 2005.[27] In 1998, under the Clinton Administration, Congress required the Department of Health and Human Services to evaluate the program’s efficiency.[28] The evaluation concluded that Head Start had little meaningful impact.[29] A New York Times article stated, “after spending six months in Head Start, 4-year-olds on average could identify only two more letters than children from similar backgrounds not in the program.”[30] From 1997 to 2002, Congress gave Head Start enough funding to accommodate for a 22 percent increase in enrollment.31 The number of children in the program increased merely 2 percent.[31]

Job Corps, another Ford project, received over $1.5 billion from the federal government in 2008.[32] Job Corps is a job-training program for disadvantaged youth. In 2003, the Department of Labor performed an evaluation of the program.[33] The study found that “Job Corps participation did not increase employment and earnings.”[34]


Funding

The Ford Foundation is a longtime supporter of the American Civil Liberties Union, as evidenced by its $7 million grant to the ACLU in 1999.[35] “The ACLU has no better partner and friend than the Ford Foundation,” said the ACLU’s former Executive Director, Ira Glasser.[36] “It is fitting that the largest single gift … ever to the ACLU, should come from Ford.”[37]

According to Discover the Networks: "A further sampling of Ford Foundation donees includes: the Tides Foundation; the Tides Center; People for the American Way; the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People Legal Defense & Education Fund; the American Friends Service Committee; the National Council of La Raza; the United States Student Association; the Center for Constitutional Rights; the National Lawyers Guild; Fenton Communications; the Al Mezan Center for Human Rights; LAW; Ittijah; MIFTAH; the New Israel Fund; the Palestinian Non-Governmental Organization Network; Alliance for Justice; the World Social Forum; the Health, Development, Information and Policy Institute; the Puerto Rican Legal Defense and Education Fund; the National Organization for Women; the Save The Children Fund; the Union of Concerned Scientists; the 2001 United Nations World Conference Against Racism; the Union for Palestinian Medical Relief Committee; the Rainforest Action Network; Public Citizen; the Earth Action Network; the Environmental Working Group; the Environmental Defense Fund; the Earth Island Institute; Friends of the Earth; Human Rights Watch; Human Rights First; the Lawyers Committee for Civil Rights Under Law; the Institute for Public Accuracy; the Migration Policy Institute; the Brookings Institution; the Ms. Foundation for Women; the International Federation of Human Rights; the National Immigration Forum; Physicians for Human Rights; Physicians for Social Responsibility; the William J. Brennan Center for Justice; the Center for Community Change; the Neighborhood Funders Group; the Council on Foundations; the International Crisis Group; the World Wildlife Fund/Conservation Foundation; the National Wildlife Federation; the Urban Institute; Trust for Public Land; Political Research Associates; Oxfam International; the Pacifica Foundation; the National Women's Law Center; National Public Radio; the National Immigration Law Center; the American Bar Association Fund for Justice and Education; the National Alliance for Choice in Giving; the Feminist Majority Foundation; the Immigrant Workers Citizenship Project; Democracy Now Productions; the Center for Women's Policy Studies; the USAction Education Fund; the Rockefeller Family Fund; the Proteus Fund; the National Committee for Responsive Philanthropy; the Ploughshares Fund; Oxfam America; the Palestinian American Research Center; the Institute for Social Justice; EcoTrust; the Worldwatch Institute; the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities; the Women’s Institute for Leadership Development for Human Rights; the Drug Policy Alliance; the Women's Environment and Development Organization; the Constitutional Rights Foundation; the Democracy Matters Institute; the Women’s Action for New Directions Education Fund; the World Resources Institute; the Women of Color Resource Center; the Center for Reproductive Rights; the Women's Foundation; the Woodstock Institute; the World Conference on Religion and Peace; the World Order Models Project; the United Nations; Progressive Leadership Alliance of Nevada; Planned Parenthood; Catholics for a Free Choice; Physicians for Reproductive Choice and Health; the New America Foundation; the Native American Rights Fund; National Partnership for Women and Families; National Interfaith Committee for Worker Justice; the Center for the Advancement of Women; the National Council of Negro Women; the International Forum on Globalization; the National Center for Lesbian Rights; the National Center for Human Rights Education; the Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender Community Center; the Lesbian and Gay Immigration Rights Task Force; the National Center for Fair and Open Testing; the Mississippi Workers Center for Human Rights; the Center for Voting and Democracy; American Council for Voluntary International Action; Global Rights; the Global Peace Congress; the Fund for Peace; the Environmental Health Coalition; the Environmental Law Institute; the Environmental Grantmakers Association; Earth House; EarthRights International; Earth Day Network; the Center for Public Policy Priorities; the Center for Public Integrity; the Center for Law and Social Policy; the Carter Center; the Border Network for Human Rights; the the International Peace Academy; the Aspen Institute; the International Gay and Lesbian Human Rights Commission; the Western Prison Project; We the People Media; Center for International Conflict Resolution; War and Peace Studies; Human Rights Justice Project; the United Nations Foundation; the Religious Coalition for Reproductive Choice Educational Fund; Refugees International; the Rebecca Project for Human Rights; the Rainforest Alliance; the Public Agenda Foundation; Progressive, Inc.; the Progressive Jewish Alliance; the Poverty and Race Research Action Council; the Population Council; the Organization for a New Equality; the North Carolina Association of Black Lawyers; the Nine to Five Working Women Education Fund; the Institute for Women's Policy Research; the Immigration and Refugee Services of America; the Humanitarian Project; the Human Family Educational and Cultural Institute; Friends of the Khalidi Library; Free Press; the Center for Economic and Social Rights; the Center for Economic and Policy Research; the Center for Defense Information; the Center for Contemplative Mind in Society; Arts of Peace; the Arms Control Association; the Tamer Institute for Community Education for Palestinians Living in the West Bank; the Arab Image Foundation in Lebanon; the Arab Studies Society; the Palestinian Independent Commission for Citizen's Rights; and the Citizens’ Commission on Civil Rights."[38]


Leadership (as of August 2011)

President: Luis A. Ubinas (2009 salary: $751,864)


Contact Information

Ford Foundation
320 East 43rd Street
New York, NY 10017
Phone: (212) 573-5000
Fax: (212) 351-3677
Website: http://www.fordfound.org


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  1. ^
    Ford Foundation, “Grants,” fordfoundation.org, available at http://www.fordfoundation.org/Grants as of August 8, 2011.
  2. ^
    Susan V. Barresford, “Taking a Long View: The Roots and Mission of the Ford Foundation,” Speeches, February 28, 2005, available at http://www.fordfoundation.org/newsroom/speeches/149 as of August 8, 2011.
  3. ^
    Mark Hemingway, “Ford Ahead: The Foundation Tightens Its Belt,” Wall Street Journal, June 26, 2009, available at http://online.wsj.com/article/SB124598045813858017.html as of August 8, 2011.
  4. ^
    Mark Hemingway, “Ford Ahead: The Foundation Tightens Its Belt,” Wall Street Journal, June 26, 2009, available at http://online.wsj.com/article/SB124598045813858017.html as of August 8, 2011.
  5. ^
    Edwin Black, Global News Service of the Jewish People, “Anti-Israel Activists at Durban were Funded by Ford Foundation,” featuregroup.com, available at http://www.featuregroup.com/fgarchive/jta.org/jta.org1/index.html as of August 8, 2011.
  6. ^ Edwin Black, Global News Service of the Jewish People, “Anti-Israel Activists at Durban were Funded by Ford Foundation,” featuregroup.com, available at http://www.featuregroup.com/fgarchive/jta.org/jta.org1/index.html as of August 8, 2011.
  7. ^
    Edwin Black, Global News Service of the Jewish People, “Anti-Israel Activists at Durban were Funded by Ford Foundation,” featuregroup.com, available at http://www.featuregroup.com/fgarchive/jta.org/jta.org1/index.html as of August 8, 2011.
  8. ^ Edwin Black, Global News Service of the Jewish People, “Anti-Israel Activists at Durban were Funded by Ford Foundation,” featuregroup.com, available at http://www.featuregroup.com/fgarchive/jta.org/jta.org1/index.html as of August 8, 2011.
  9. ^ Edwin Black, Global News Service of the Jewish People, “Anti-Israel Activists at Durban were Funded by Ford Foundation,” featuregroup.com, available at http://www.featuregroup.com/fgarchive/jta.org/jta.org1/index.html as of August 8, 2011.
  10. ^ Edwin Black, Global News Service of the Jewish People, “Anti-Israel Activists at Durban were Funded by Ford Foundation,” featuregroup.com, available at http://www.featuregroup.com/fgarchive/jta.org/jta.org1/index.html as of August 8, 2011.
  11. ^ Wall Street Journal, “Henry Ford’s ‘Legacy’,” Wall Street Journal Review and Outlook, December 26, 2003, downloaded from http://www.featuregroup.com/fgarchive/wsj.com/index.html on June 14, 2010.
  12. ^ Wall Street Journal, “Henry Ford’s ‘Legacy’,” Wall Street Journal Review and Outlook, December 26, 2003, downloaded from http://www.featuregroup.com/fgarchive/wsj.com/index.html on June 14, 2010.
  13. ^
    Mark Hemingway, “Ford Ahead: The Foundation Tightens Its Belt,” Wall Street Journal, June 26, 2009, downloaded from http://online.wsj.com/article/SB124598045813858017.html on June 14, 2010.
  14. ^ Mark Hemingway, “Ford Ahead: The Foundation Tightens Its Belt,” Wall Street Journal, June 26, 2009, downloaded from http://online.wsj.com/article/SB124598045813858017.html on June 14, 2010.
  15. ^ Mark Hemingway, “Ford Ahead: The Foundation Tightens Its Belt,” Wall Street Journal, June 26, 2009, downloaded from http://online.wsj.com/article/SB124598045813858017.html on June 14, 2010.
  16. ^
    Breitbart, “Ford Foundation Commits $85 Million to Advance Rural Land Rights and Reduce Climate Change,” breitbart.com, July 29, 2010, available at http://www.breitbart.com/article.php?id=xprnw.20100729.DC42839&show_article=1 as of August 8, 2011.
  17. ^ Breitbart, “Ford Foundation Commits $85 Million to Advance Rural Land Rights and Reduce Climate Change,” breitbart.com, July 29, 2010, available at http://www.breitbart.com/article.php?id=xprnw.20100729.DC42839&show_article=1 as of August 8, 2011.
  18. ^ Breitbart, “Ford Foundation Commits $85 Million to Advance Rural Land Rights and Reduce Climate Change,” breitbart.com, July 29, 2010, available at http://www.breitbart.com/article.php?id=xprnw.20100729.DC42839&show_article=1 as of August 8, 2011.
  19. ^
    Ronald Roach, “Ford Diversity Fellows Urged to Defend Affirmative Action,” diverseeducation.com, October 20, 2005, downloaded from http://diverseeducation.com/artman/publish/article_4898.shtml on August 4, 2010.
  20. ^ Ronald Roach, “Ford Diversity Fellows Urged to Defend Affirmative Action,” diverseeducation.com, October 20, 2005, downloaded from http://diverseeducation.com/artman/publish/article_4898.shtml on August 4, 2010.
  21. ^ Ronald Roach, “Ford Diversity Fellows Urged to Defend Affirmative Action,” diverseeducation.com, October 20, 2005, downloaded from http://diverseeducation.com/artman/publish/article_4898.shtml on August 4, 2010.
  22. ^ Review and Outlook, “The Edsel of Education Reform,” Wall Street Journal, November 17, 2009, available at http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052748704402404574527641778464958.html as of August 8, 2011.
  23. ^
    Review and Outlook, “The Edsel of Education Reform,” Wall Street Journal, November 17, 2009, available at http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052748704402404574527641778464958.html as of August 8, 2011.
  24. ^ Review and Outlook, “The Edsel of Education Reform,” Wall Street Journal, November 17, 2009, available at http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052748704402404574527641778464958.html as of August 8, 2011.
  25. ^ Review and Outlook, “The Edsel of Education Reform,” Wall Street Journal, November 17, 2009, available at http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052748704402404574527641778464958.html as of August 8, 2011.
  26. ^
    Review and Outlook, “The Edsel of Education Reform,” Wall Street Journal, November 17, 2009, available at http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052748704402404574527641778464958.html as of August 8, 2011.
  27. ^ Douglas B. Besharov and Douglas M. Call, “Head Start Falls Further Behind,” New York Times, February 7, 2009, available at http://www.nytimes.com/2009/02/08/opinion/08besharov.html as of August 8, 2011.
  28. ^ Douglas B. Besharov and Douglas M. Call, “Head Start Falls Further Behind,” New York Times, February 7, 2009, available at http://www.nytimes.com/2009/02/08/opinion/08besharov.html as of August 8, 2011.
  29. ^ Douglas B. Besharov and Douglas M. Call, “Head Start Falls Further Behind,” New York Times, February 7, 2009, available at http://www.nytimes.com/2009/02/08/opinion/08besharov.html as of August 8, 2011.
  30. ^ Douglas B. Besharov and Douglas M. Call, “Head Start Falls Further Behind,” New York Times, February 7, 2009, available at http://www.nytimes.com/2009/02/08/opinion/08besharov.html as of August 8, 2011.
  31. ^ Douglas B. Besharov and Douglas M. Call, “Head Start Falls Further Behind,” New York Times, February 7, 2009, available at http://www.nytimes.com/2009/02/08/opinion/08besharov.html as of August 8, 2011.
  32. ^
    David Muhlhausen, “Job Corps: A Consistent Record of Failure,” Heritage Foundation, February 28, 2007, available at http://www.heritage.org/Research/Reports/2007/02/Job-Corps-A-Consistent-Record-of-Failure as of August 8, 2011.
  33. ^ David Muhlhausen, “Job Corps: A Consistent Record of Failure,” Heritage Foundation, February 28, 2007, available at http://www.heritage.org/Research/Reports/2007/02/Job-Corps-A-Consistent-Record-of-Failure as of August 8, 2011.
  34. ^ David Muhlhausen, “Job Corps: A Consistent Record of Failure,” Heritage Foundation, February 28, 2007, available at http://www.heritage.org/Research/Reports/2007/02/Job-Corps-A-Consistent-Record-of-Failure as of August 8, 2011.
  35. ^
    ACLU, “Ford Foundation Gives $7 Million to ACLU Endowment Campaign,” American Civil Liberties Union - Press Release, June 28, 1999, available at http://www.aclu.org/organization-news-and-highlights/ford-foundation-gives-7-million-aclu-endowment-campaign as of August 8, 2011.
  36. ^ ACLU, “Ford Foundation Gives $7 Million to ACLU Endowment Campaign,” American Civil Liberties Union - Press Release, June 28, 1999, available at http://www.aclu.org/organization-news-and-highlights/ford-foundation-gives-7-million-aclu-endowment-campaign as of August 8, 2011.
  37. ^ ACLU, “Ford Foundation Gives $7 Million to ACLU Endowment Campaign,” American Civil Liberties Union - Press Release, June 28, 1999, available at http://www.aclu.org/organization-news-and-highlights/ford-foundation-gives-7-million-aclu-endowment-campaign as of August 8, 2011.
  38. ^
    Discoverthenetworks.org, “Ford Foundation Profile,” Discover the Networks, available at http://www.discoverthenetworks.org/funderProfile.asp?fndid=5176 as of August 8, 2011.